Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror Volume 3 Number 1 (#7)

The story, “The Cairn on the Headland”, is considered to be part of the Cthulhu Mythos. It was first published in this magazine. In this case mixed also with elements of both Norse Mythology and Catholic Christianity. in this case mixed also with elements of both Norse Mythology and Catholic Christianity.

It has a rather convoluted history, being in effect an adaptation of Howard’s earlier story Spears of Clontarf, a historical adventure story by Howard focusing on the Battle of Clontarf (1014) and featuring Turlogh Dubh O’Brien or Black Turlogh, a fictional 11th Century Irishman created by Howard. Howard later rewrote “Spears” as “The Grey God Passes”, which was very similar to Spears of Clontarf, but with added fantasy elements. Howard failed to sell the story in either version during his lifetime.

“The Cairn on the Headland” (Howard’s third version of Spears of Clontarf) was a horror story set in the present, and succeeded in getting published in Strange Tales (January, 1933). It was later reprinted in August Derleth’s Skull-Face and Others, as well as in Lancer Books’ paperback collection Wolfshead.

(The Grey God Passes was posthumously published in a 1962 Arkham House hardcover Dark Minds, Dark Heart, while Spears of Clontarf was finally published in an eponymous 1978 chapbook).

Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror) was an American pulp magazine first published from 1931 to 1933 by Clayton Publications. It specialized in fantasy and weird fiction, and was a significant competitor to Weird Tales, the leading magazine in the field. Its published stories include “Wolves of Darkness” by Jack Williamson, as well as work by Robert E. Howard and Clark Ashton Smith. The magazine ceased publication when Clayton entered bankruptcy. It was temporarily revived by Wildside Press, which published three issues edited by Robert M. Price from 2003 to 2007.

Contents

  • 7 • Human Embers • (1933) • essay by uncredited
  • 8 • The Second Interment • (1933) • short story by Clark Ashton Smith
  • 9 •  The Second Interment • (1933) • interior artwork by Amos Sewell
  • 16 • Powwows of John George Hohman • (1933) • essay by uncredited
  • 18 • The Thing That Walked on the Wind • [Cthulhu Mythos] • (1933) • short story by August Derleth [as by August W. Derleth]
  • 19 •  The Thing That Walked on the Wind • (1933) • interior artwork by Rafael DeSoto
  • 27 • The Legend of Gogmagog’s Leap • (1933) • essay by uncredited
  • 28 • The Terror by Night • (1933) • short story by Charles Willard Diffin
  • 29 •  The Terror by Night • (1933) • interior artwork by H. W. Wesso
  • 42 • White Lady • (1933) • short story by Sophie Wenzel Ellis
  • 43 •  White Lady • (1933) • interior artwork by H. W. Wesso
  • 50 • Murgunstrumm • (1933) • novella by Hugh B. Cave
  • 50 •  Murgunstrumm • (1933) • interior artwork by Amos Sewell
  • 107 • Alburtus Magnus • (1933) • essay by uncredited
  • 108 • The Napier Limousine • [Gerald Canevin] • (1933) • novelette by Henry S. Whitehead
  • 109 •  The Napier Limousine • (1933) • interior artwork by Amos Sewell
  • 120 • Headless Ghosts • (1933) • essay by uncredited
  • 122 • The Cairn on the Headland • (1933) • short story by Robert E. Howard
  • 123 •  The Cairn on the Headland • (1933) • interior artwork by Amos Sewell
  • 136 • The Cauldron (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror, January 1933): • (1933) • essay by various
  • 136 •  The Cauldron • (1932) • interior artwork by Amos Sewell
  • 136 •  Letter (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror, January 1933): Expert Opinion • (1933) • essay by August Derleth
  • 137 •  Letter (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror, January 1933): “All Good” • (1933) • essay by Frank Thurston Torbett [as by F. T. Torbett]
  • 137 •  Letter (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror, January 1933): This and That • (1933) • essay by Philip Turner (I)
  • 137 •  Letter (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror, January 1933): The Tale of Macrocosmic Horror • (1933) • essay by Clark Ashton Smith
  • 138 •  Letter (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror, January 1933): Like and No Like • (1933) • essay by Jennifer A. Hall [as by J. A. Hall]
  • 140 •  Letter (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror, January 1933): From a Sorcerer’s Apprentice • (1933) • essay by Jack Foley (I)
Publisher :Clayton Magazines Inc.
Year :January 1933
Replica by:Girsasol (March 2003), Fiction House Press (April 2019), Wildside (September 2004)
Format :Periodical (Pulp Magazine)
Pages :144
Cover :H. W. Wesso
Illustrations :Listed under notes

Notes

Edited by Harry Bates
“The Cairn on the Headland” is illustrated by Amos Sewell

All uncredited non-fiction is not listed on the contents page, and is probably by Bates.
All artwork is uncredited, except for the cover, credit is assigned by artist’s signiture.
Cover illustrates “Murgunstrumm” by Hugh B. Cave.
“The Cauldron” is the magazine’s letter section, and is subtitled “A Meeting Place for Sorcerers and Apprentices.”
Amos Sewell’s header illustration is undated as it may have headed all of the magazine’s letter columns, and it is subtitled “Fire Burn and Cauldron Bubble.”
The interior art for “The Second Internment” is signed “AS”. The signature is identical to that of Amos Sewell’s.
There is an ad for the very first issue of My Love Story on page four.

Interior Artists

Amos Sewell
Rafael DeSoto
H. W. Wesso

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Strange Tales #7

The story, “The Cairn on the Headland”, is considered to be part of the Cthulhu Mythos. It was first published in this magazine. In this case mixed also with elements of both Norse Mythology and Catholic Christianity. in this case mixed also with elements of both Norse Mythology and Catholic Christianity.

Tags: August Derleth / Clark Ashton Smith / Hugh B. Cave / James O'Brien / Pulp / Robert E. Howard