REH: Two-Gun Raconteur #3

The third issue of REH: Two-Gun Raconteur, from 1976. Contains ‘Conan vs. Conantics’ by Don Herron and ‘The Devil’s Joker’ by Howard. Also several articles and an art portfolio by Gene Day.

In the mid-1970s, when the Robert E. Howard Boom was just beginning, REH: Two-Gun Raconteur was on the cutting edge of Howard Fandom. During those heady days there was a continuous stream of hardback books, paperbacks, magazines, comics, chapbooks, fanzines, art portfolios and one-shot publications all devoted to the gifted author and poet from Cross Plains, Texas. When the Boom eventually faded out in the late eighties, the fans and admirers of Robert E. Howard still carried the torch, waiting for a time when Howard would return and that time has come. While not on as grand a scale as the earlier boom, it is nonetheless a great time to be a Howard fan.

REH: Two-Gun Raconteur #5

After 26 years without any published issues, Damon Sasser returned with issue #5 of REH: Two-Gun Raconteur in 2003. Contains the story ‘A Horror in the Night’ by Robert E. Howard, an art folio by Stephen Fabian and several articles.

In the mid-1970s, when the Robert E. Howard Boom was just beginning, REH: Two-Gun Raconteur was on the cutting edge of Howard Fandom. During those heady days there was a continuous stream of hardback books, paperbacks, magazines, comics, chapbooks, fanzines, art portfolios and one-shot publications all devoted to the gifted author and poet from Cross Plains, Texas. When the Boom eventually faded out in the late eighties, the fans and admirers of Robert E. Howard still carried the torch, waiting for a time when Howard would return and that time has come. While not on as grand a scale as the earlier boom, it is nonetheless a great time to be a Howard fan.

REH: Two-Gun Raconteur #6

Damon Sasser’s REH: Two-Gun Raconteur i#6 from 2004. Contains the story ‘Under the Baobab Tree’ by Howard. Also a Red Nails art portfolio by Gene Day and several articles.

In the mid-1970s, when the Robert E. Howard Boom was just beginning, REH: Two-Gun Raconteur was on the cutting edge of Howard Fandom. During those heady days there was a continuous stream of hardback books, paperbacks, magazines, comics, chapbooks, fanzines, art portfolios and one-shot publications all devoted to the gifted author and poet from Cross Plains, Texas. When the Boom eventually faded out in the late eighties, the fans and admirers of Robert E. Howard still carried the torch, waiting for a time when Howard would return and that time has come. While not on as grand a scale as the earlier boom, it is nonetheless a great time to be a Howard fan.

REH: Two-Gun Raconteur #10

REH: Two-Gun Raconteur #10 from 2006. First cover in color. Contains ‘The Voice of Death’ by Howard also the opening and the ending of the short version of “Three-Bladed Doom” are printed for the first time here. Also an art portfolio by Bill Cavalier.

Sword & Fantasy #1

Fanzine published by James Van Hise.

Articles include detailed guides to several classic Robert E. Howard fanzines (CROSS PLAINS, LONE STAR FICTIONEER, etc). Jim also gives a detailed look at the Robert E. Howard story “Valley of the Worm.” There is also the transcript to the Wandering Star Robert E. Howard panel (which I was on) from the 2002 San Diego Comicon. Plus featuring his 7,000 word article on Karl Edward Wagner’s KANE series wherein he reviews and examines every published Kane story Wagner wrote. Jim also takes a detailed look at Gil Kane’s classic sword & sorcery comic BLACKMARK.

This issue also features artwork by Mike Zeck (a vintage Conan illustration he did in the 1970s, which is a real knockout), art by Steve Fabian, Rick McCollum and others. Plus some surprises, like a nice repro of an illo from the WEIRD TALES appearance of “Kings of the Night”.

The Dark Man V5N2 (#15): The Journal of Robert E. Howard Studies

Edited by Mark Hall. The Dark Man V5N2.

The Dark Man: Journal of Robert E. Howard and Pulp Studies is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal devoted to the academic study of Robert E. Howard’s literary legacy as well as the literary historical and print culture contexts associated with it. The journal seeks to publish full-length articles, brief critical notes and commentaries, bibliographies, reviews of books, and other scholarship that treats Howard’s life, time, literary work, and associated topics such as Weird Tales, H.P. Lovecraft, and the concept of a transhistorical pulp fiction aesthetic.