Weird Tales February 1937

In “Dig Me No Grave”, the story is narrated by Kirowan, an approach Howard abandoned for the later stories, in which he kept the first person perspective but had an unnamed narrator.

Kirowan is awakened by Conrad in the middle of the night. Conrad has just left the side of John Grimlan, who has died in a most unpleasant manner. Years earlier Grimlan had made Conrad swear to follow the instructions in a sealed envelope after his death. Conrad was to follow these instructions no matter how much Grimlan might change his mind. As he was dying Grimlan begged Conrad not to follow the instructions but to burn the envelope.

Contents

  • 130 • The Globe of Memories • novella by Seabury Quinn
  • 131 •  The Globe of Memories • interior artwork by Virgil Finlay (variant of cover art for Weird Tales, February 1937)
  • 157 • Dead Singer • poem by Edgar Daniel Kramer
  • 158 • I, the Vampire • short story by Henry Kuttner
  • 159 •  I, the Vampire • interior artwork by Jim Mooney [as by James Mooney, Jr.]
  • 171 • Dig Me No Grave • [Cthulhu Mythos Tales] • short story by Robert E. Howard
  • 171 •  Dig Me No Grave • interior artwork by Virgil Finlay
  • 180 • The Vaunsburg Plague • short story by Julius Long
  • 180 •  The Vaunsburg Plague • interior artwork by Harold S. De Lay [as by Harold S. DeLay]
  • 193 • The Beggar • poem by Frances Elliott
  • 194 • The Poppy Pearl • novelette by Frank Owen
  • 195 •  The Poppy Pearl • interior artwork by Virgil Finlay
  • 220 • Song of the Necromancer • poem by Clark Ashton Smith
  • 221 • At the Time Appointed • short story by Loretta Burrough
  • 221 •  At the Time Appointed • interior artwork by Harold S. De Lay [as by Harold S. DeLay]
  • 230 •  Weird Tales, February 1937 • [Weird Tales Decorations] • interior artwork by Andrew Brosnatch (variant of Six Bearded Men 1924)
  • 231 • Glory Hand • short story by August Derleth [as by August W. Derleth]
  • 237 • Masquerade • short story by Mearle Prout
  • 241 •  Weird Story Reprint • (1928) • interior artwork by Hugh Rankin
  • 241 • A Gipsy Prophecy • (1914) • short story by Bram Stoker (variant of The Gipsy Prophecy)
  • 249 • The Eyrie (Weird Tales, February 1937) • [The Eyrie] • essay by The Editor
  • 249 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937) • essay by John Seymour
  • 249 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): The Necronomicon • essay by Fred C. Miles
  • 250 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): One Gloomy Evening • essay by Richard H. Jamison [as by Richard F. Jamison]
  • 250 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): A Pæan of Praise • essay by Gertrude M. Breazeale
  • 250 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): The Theatre Upstairs • essay by Robert A. Madle
  • 251 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Fearn’s Debut in WT • essay by Jack Johnson
  • 251 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Finlay’s Nudes • essay by Sylvanus K. Post
  • 252 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Oogy! Oogier! Oogiest! • essay by Gertrude Hemken
  • 252 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Stories of Reincarnation • essay by Van Rosicruis
  • 252 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): The Ghosts Return • essay by Charles H. Deems
  • 253 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Werewolves Out-moded? • essay by Miss Eve Barnett
  • 253 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Praise and Dispraise • essay by Bruce Bryan
  • 254 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): In Praise of H. P. Lovecraft • essay by Henry Kuttner
  • 254 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Ladies in the Raw • essay by Walter A. Thorne
  • 254 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): St. John and Brundage • essay by John V. Baltadonis
  • 255 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): An All-Star Issue • essay by John J. Weir
  • 255 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): A Plea for Serials • essay by E. M. Stubbs
  • 256 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Brief Comments • essay by Horace Ferris
  • 256 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Brief Comments • essay by Charles Henry Mackintosh
  • 256 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Brief Comments • essay by Donald Coreyon
  • 256 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Brief Comments • essay by Alvin V. Pershing
  • 256 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Brief Comments • essay by August Derleth [as by August W. Derleth]
  • 256 •  Letter (Weird Tales, February 1937): Brief Comments • essay by Henry Kuttner
  • bep • Coming Next Month (Weird Tales, February 1937) • essay by uncredited
Publisher : Popular Fiction Publishing Company
Year : February 1937
Replica by:  
Format : Pulp
Pages : 132
Cover : Virgil Finlay
Illustrations : Se above

Notes

Volume 29, Number 2.
Page numbering runs from 129-256 excluding covers.

Howard Works ISFDB

 

If you like to read a copy of this, click the button. 

Read it now!

In “Dig Me No Grave”, the story is narrated by Kirowan, an approach Howard abandoned for the later stories, in which he kept the first person perspective but had an unnamed narrator.

Kirowan is awakened by Conrad in the middle of the night. Conrad has just left the side of John Grimlan, who has died in a most unpleasant manner. Years earlier Grimlan had made Conrad swear to follow the instructions in a sealed envelope after his death. Conrad was to follow these instructions no matter how much Grimlan might change his mind. As he was dying Grimlan begged Conrad not to follow the instructions but to burn the envelope.

Tags: Pulp / Robert E. Howard / Weird Tales