The Hour of the Dragon, also known as Conan the Conqueror, is a fantasy novel by American writer Robert E. Howard featuring his sword and sorcery hero Conan the Cimmerian. It was one of the last Conan stories published before Howard’s suicide, although not the last to be written. The novel was first published in serial form in the December 1935 through April 1936 issues of the pulp magazine Weird Tales. The first book edition was published by Gnome Press in hardcover in 1950. The Gnome Press edition retitled the story Conan the Conqueror, a title retained by all subsequent editions until 1977, when the original title was restored in an edition issued published by Berkley/Putnam in 1977. The Berkley edition also reverted the text to that of its original Weird Tales publication, discarding later edits. Later editions have generally followed Berkley and published under the original title. The 1997 film Kull the Conqueror is loosely based on The Hour of the Dragon, replacing Conan with Kull but otherwise keeping the same basic plot.

Contents

  • 658 • The Hour of the Dragon (Part 1 of 5) • [Conan] • serial by Robert E. Howard (book publication as Conan the Conqueror 1950)
  • 659 •  The Hour of the Dragon (Part 1 of 5) • interior artwork by Vincent Napoli
  • 685 • Dancing Feet • short story by Paul Ernst
  • 685 •  Dancing Feet • interior artwork by Virgil Finlay
  • 694 •  Weird Tales, December 1935 • [Weird Tales Decorations] • interior artwork by Virgil Finlay
  • 695 • The Chain of Aforgomon • short story by Clark Ashton Smith
  • 695 •  The Chain of Aforgomon • interior artwork by Virgil Finlay
  • 706 • Disillusionment • poem by Victoria Beaudin Johnson
  • 707 • The Great Brain of Kaldar • novelette by Edmond Hamilton
  • 707 •  The Great Brain of Kaldar • interior artwork by Virgil Finlay
  • 727 • The Haunted Castle • poem by W. L. Hasty, Jr.
  • 728 • The Carnival of Death (Part 4 of 4) • serial by Arlton Eadie
  • 728 •  The Carnival of Death (Part 4 of 4) • interior artwork by Jack Binder
  • 731 •  Lady Thelma • (1935) • interior artwork by Jack Binder
  • 731 •  Claude Delorme • (1935) • interior artwork by Jack Binder
  • 733 •  Celia Mounthead • (1935) • interior artwork by Jack Binder
  • 739 •  Edwin Lorimer • (1935) • interior artwork by Jack Binder
  • 741 •  Artemus Figg • (1935) • interior artwork by Jack Binder
  • 743 •  Wilmer Denton • (1935) • interior artwork by Jack Binder
  • 743 •  Kareef • (1935) • interior artwork by Jack Binder
  • 743 •  Lord Mounthead • (1935) • interior artwork by Jack Binder
  • 744 •  Weird Tales, December 1935 • [Weird Tales Decorations] • interior artwork by uncredited (variant of Weird Tales, January 1925 [2] 1925)
  • 745 • The Man with the Blue Beard • novelette by Harold Ward
  • 745 •  The Man with the Blue Beard • interior artwork by Robert Delson
  • 761 • The Hedge • short story by Alfred I. Tooke
  • 764 • Lead Soldiers • short story by Robert Barbour Johnson
  • 767 •  Weird Story Reprint • (1928) • interior artwork by Hugh Rankin
  • 767 • Lukundoo • (1925) • short story by Edward Lucas White
  • 773 • Coming Next Month (Weird Tales, December 1935) • essay by uncredited
  • 778 •  The Eyrie • (1924) • interior artwork by Andrew Brosnatch
  • 778 • The Eyrie (Weird Tales, December 1935) • [The Eyrie] • essay by The Editor
  • 778 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): Orchids for the October Issue • essay by Robert Leonard Russell
  • 778 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): October Issue a Corker • essay by B. M. Reynolds
  • 779 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): At Full Strength • essay by Julius Hopkins
  • 779 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): From an Old Reader • essay by Edward L. Gilroy
  • 779 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): Wolf-head • essay by Charles H. Deems
  • 780 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): First Kick in Ten Years • essay by Mary Ann Carter
  • 780 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): Edmond Hamilton’s Stories • essay by Robert A. Madle
  • 780 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): A Pioneer Reader Comments on WT • essay by Annette Velkers
  • 780 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): Random Remarks by an Author • essay by Robert Bloch
  • 780 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): Old Controversies • essay by Clifford F. Shine
  • 781 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): Local Lad Makes Good • essay by J. Wellington
  • 781 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): Never Disappointed • essay by Donald Allgeier
  • 782 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): The September WT • essay by William J. Smith
  • 782 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): Through the Vortex • essay by Orby Martin
  • 782 •  Letter (Weird Tales, December 1935): Three Cheers for Doc Satan • essay by Herbert H. Hillier
Publisher : Popular Fiction Publishing Company
Year : December 1935
Replica by:  
Format : Pulp
Pages : 132
Cover : Margaret Brundage
Illustrations : Se above

Notes

Volume 26, Number 6.
Page number run from 657 to 784 and do not include the covers.
Data from a facsimile of this issue, which is missing the final two pages. There may be additional content on those pages which is not indexed here.

If you like to read a copy of this, click the button. 

Read it now!

Weird Tales 1935 December

The Hour of the Dragon, also known as Conan the Conqueror, is a fantasy novel by American writer Robert E. Howard featuring his sword and sorcery hero Conan the Cimmerian. It was one of the last Conan stories published before Howard’s suicide, although not the last to be written. The novel was first published in serial form in the December 1935 through April 1936 issues of the pulp magazine Weird Tales. The first book edition was published by Gnome Press in hardcover in 1950. The Gnome Press edition retitled the story Conan the Conqueror, a title retained by all subsequent editions until 1977, when the original title was restored in an edition issued published by Berkley/Putnam in 1977. The Berkley edition also reverted the text to that of its original Weird Tales publication, discarding later edits. Later editions have generally followed Berkley and published under the original title. The 1997 film Kull the Conqueror is loosely based on The Hour of the Dragon, replacing Conan with Kull but otherwise keeping the same basic plot.

Tags: Conan / Pulp / Robert E. Howard / Weird Tales