Weird Tales March 1935

Robert E. Howard set his story in Hyborian Age’s equivalent Africa. The Teeth of Gwahlur are legendary jewels, kept within the ancient city of Alkmeenon, in the country of Keshan “which in itself was considered mythical by many northern and western nations”.

Conan, following rumors of this treasure, journeys into Keshan and offers his services in training the local army against their rival, Punt. However, Thutmekri, a Stygian thief with similar intentions, and his Shemitish partner, Zargheba, also arrive in the country with an offer for a military alliance with another of Punt’s neighbors, Zembabwei, with some of the Teeth to seal their pact. The high priest of Keshan, Gorulga, announces that a decision on the matter can only be made after consulting with Yelaya, the mummified oracle of Alkmeenon. This is all the treasure hunters require. Conan and Zargheba (independently of each other) travel to the city ahead of Gorulga’s expedition.

Contents

  • 274 • Lord of the Lamia (Part 1 of 3) • serial by Otis Adelbert Kline
  • 274 •  Lord of the Lamia (Part 1 of 3) • interior artwork by Joseph Doolin
  • 289 • Sonnet of the Unsleeping Dead • poem by Parker White
  • 290 • Clutching Hands of Death • short story by Harold Ward
  • 291 •  Clutching Hands of Death • interior artwork by Joseph Doolin
  • 299 • Jewels of Gwahlur • [Conan] • novelette by Robert E. Howard
  • 299 •  Jewels of Gwahlur • interior artwork by Joseph Doolin
  • 328 • Julhi • [Northwest Smith] • novelette by C. L. Moore
  • 328 •  Julhi • interior artwork by C. L. Moore
  • 349 •  Weird Tales, March 1935 • [Weird Tales Decorations] • interior artwork by Andrew Brosnatch (variant of Weird Tales, November 1924 1924)
  • 350 • Rulers of the Future (Part 3 of 3) • serial by Paul Ernst
  • 350 •  Rulers of the Future (Part 3 of 3) • interior artwork by H. R. Hammond
  • 370 • Drums of the Congo • poem by Katherine van der Veer
  • 371 • What Waits in Darkness • short story by Loretta Burrough
  • 375 • The Sealed Casket • short story by Richard F. Searight
  • 380 •  Weird Story Reprint • (1928) • interior artwork by Hugh Rankin
  • 380 • The Judge’s House • (1891) • short story by Bram Stoker
  • 392 •  The Eyrie • (1924) • interior artwork by Andrew Brosnatch
  • 392 • The Eyrie (Weird Tales, March 1935) • [The Eyrie] • essay by The Editor
  • 392 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): A Cup of Sparkling Joy • essay by Ed. Camille
  • 392 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): The Trail of the Cloven Hoof • essay by Carroll Wales
  • 392 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Best Stories of 1934 • essay by Donald Allgeier [as by Donald V. Allgeier]
  • 393 • Coming Next Month (Weird Tales, March 1935) • essay by uncredited
  • 394 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Uniformly Good Stories • essay by John R. Small
  • 394 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Jornado’s Fate in “Black Bagheela” • essay by ‘A Lover of Conan the Cimmerian’
  • 394 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): The Champion Team • essay by Eugene Benefiel
  • 395 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): WT at Midnight • essay by J. Walter Biggs
  • 396 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): A New Weird Tales Fan • essay by E. W. E.
  • 396 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Bloch’s Attacks on Howard • essay by Kirk Mashburn
  • 396 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): New Ideas in Science-Fiction • essay by B. M. Reynolds
  • 396 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Without a Gas-Mask • essay by H. A. Harris
  • 396 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): In Praise of Quinn • essay by Michael Liene
  • 397 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Better and Better • essay by Mrs. A. G. Edwards
  • 397 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Conan and Jirel and Smith • essay by Fritz Stough
  • 398 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Precious Space Wasted • essay by Joseph Robinsky
  • 398 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): The January Issue • essay by Julius Hopkins
  • 399 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): The Music of Erich Zann • essay by Robert Nelson
  • 399 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Comments from California • essay by Fred Anger
  • 399 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Robert Bloch’s Story • essay by Mrs. L. E. Goodman
  • 400 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Pithy Comments • essay by Edith M. Olson
  • 400 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Pithy Comments • essay by Alice Hilton
  • 400 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Pithy Comments • essay by W. C. Flack
  • 400 •  Letter (Weird Tales, March 1935): Pithy Comments • essay by Alvin Earl Perry
Publisher : Popular Fiction Publishing Company
Year : March 1935
Replica by: Girasol February 2014
Format : Pulp
Pages : 132
Cover : Margaret Brundage
Illustrations : Se above

Notes

Volume 25, Number 3.
Page numbers run 273-400 excluding covers.
Interior art credit for “The Eyrie” per Jaffery & Cook The Collector’s Index to Weird Tales.

If you like to read a copy of this, click the button. 

Read it now!

Robert E. Howard set his story in Hyborian Age’s equivalent Africa. The Teeth of Gwahlur are legendary jewels, kept within the ancient city of Alkmeenon, in the country of Keshan “which in itself was considered mythical by many northern and western nations”.

Conan, following rumors of this treasure, journeys into Keshan and offers his services in training the local army against their rival, Punt. However, Thutmekri, a Stygian thief with similar intentions, and his Shemitish partner, Zargheba, also arrive in the country with an offer for a military alliance with another of Punt’s neighbors, Zembabwei, with some of the Teeth to seal their pact. The high priest of Keshan, Gorulga, announces that a decision on the matter can only be made after consulting with Yelaya, the mummified oracle of Alkmeenon. This is all the treasure hunters require. Conan and Zargheba (independently of each other) travel to the city ahead of Gorulga’s expedition.

Tags: Conan / Pulp / Robert E. Howard / Weird Tales