Contains an extract from a letter from Robert E. Howard to Weird Tales, ca. March 1926,
“. . . while told in plain, almost homely language, . . .”. No Howard stories in this one.

Contents

  • 581 • The Ghosts of Steamboat Coulee • novelette by Arthur J. Burks
  • 599 • The Devil-Ray (Part 1 of 3) • serial by Joel Martin Nichols, Jr.
  • 609 • The Dead Hand • [Jules de Grandin] • short story by Seabury Quinn
  • 619 • The Silent Trees • short story by Frank Owen
  • 625 • The Man Who Was Saved • short story by B. W. Sliney
  • 631 • Bat’s Belfry • short story by August Derleth
  • 637 • Queen of the Vortex • [Duval] • novelette by F. William Sarles
  • 654 • The Werewolf • short story by Frederick Marryat (variant of The Werewolf (excerpt: chapter 39 of The Phantom Ship) 1839) [as by H. B. Marryat]
  • 664 • Horreur Sympathique • poem by Charles Baudelaire (trans. of Horreur sympathique 1861)
  • 665 • Across the Gulf • short story by Henry S. Whitehead
  • 671 • The Moon Dance • poem by A. Leslie
  • 672 • Vials of Wrath • short story by Edith Lyle Ragsdale
  • 678 • The Experiment of Erich Weigert • short story by Sewell Peaslee Wright
  • 685 • The Confession of a Madman • short story by James Cocks
  • 698 • The Derelict Mine (Part 2 of 3) • serial by Frank A. Mochnant
  • 713 • The Dance of Death • poem by Jean Lahor (trans. of Égalité, Fraternité … 1893) [as by Jean Lahors]
  • 714 •  The Eyrie • (1924) • interior artwork by Andrew Brosnatch
  • 714 • The Eyrie (Weird Tales, May 1926) • [The Eyrie] • essay by The Editor
Publisher : Popular Fiction Publishing Company
Year : May 1926
Replica by: Girsasol Collectables
Format : Pulp
Pages : 144
Cover : Andrew Bensen
Illustrations : Listed under notes

Notes

Weird Tales Volume 7 Number 5.
Data from a facsimile of this issue.
Page numbers run from 577 to 720 not including the covers.

Illustrators:

Andrew Brosnatch

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Contains an extract from a letter from Robert E. Howard to Weird Tales, ca. March 1926,
“. . . while told in plain, almost homely language, . . .”. No Howard stories in this one.

Tags: Pulp / Robert E. Howard / Weird Tales