“The Lost Valley of Iskander” is an El Borak short story by Robert E. Howard. It was not published within Howard’s lifetime, the first publication was in the FAX Collector’s Editions hardback The Lost Valley of Iskander in 1974.[1] Its original title was “Swords of the Hills”.

In this story, El Borak discovers a legendary valley in which live Greek descendants of Alexander the Great invading army. Meanwhile, the vital package he carries must be carried to British India before the Hungarian, Hunyadi, can stop him or thousands will die.

“The Daughter of Erlik Khan” is another El Borak short story. It was originally published in the December 1934 issue of the pulp magazine Top-Notch.

“Hawk of the Hills” is also an El Borak short story. It was originally published in the June 1935 issue of the pulp magazine Top-Notch, one of only five of the El Borak stories published within Howard’s lifetime. The story was featured as the cover of that issue.

Contents

  • vii • Introduction (The Lost Valley of Iskander) • (1974) • essay by Darrell C. Richardson
  • 3 • The Daughter of Erlik Khan • [El Borak] • (1934) • novella by Robert E. Howard
  • 93 • The Lost Valley of Iskander • [El Borak] • (1974) • novelette by Robert E. Howard
  • 135 • Hawk of the Hills • [El Borak] • (1935) • novelette by Robert E. Howard

Notes

1st known printing

Publisher:Berkley
Year :September 1979
Book No. :042504243X
Edition :1st
Format :Paperback
Pages :207
Cover :Ken Kelly
Illustrations :None

 

Cover art by Ken Kelly
Cover art by Ken Kelly

 

The Lost Valley of Iskander

Shipwrecked on a mysterious island, two sailors find traces of a lost civilization – and memories of their own impossible part in it! …The „last words” of an operatic tenor bring the music of hell to the man who destroyed him….Turlogh O’Brien, mighty Gaelic warrior who serves no master but gold and blood, battles for a kingdom against the fearful ancient gods of Bal-Sagoth. All together for the first time in The Gods of Bal-Sagoth.

Tags: Darrel C. Richardson / El Borak / Robert E. Howard