Treasures of Tartary and Other Heroic Tales

A collection of very different stories. From the introduction: 

One situation which Howard liked to use was the American hero in the Middle East. In the opening paragraph of “Treasures of Tartary,” it is Kirby O’Donnell who finds himself plunging into the middle of a battle in a dark alley in Shahrazar. Though O’Donnell is an American, he dresses like an Arab, is fluent in their languages, and is burned so dark by the sun that he can pass for a native, which he does in this story. None of the other characters are aware of his true identity. Yet Howard frequently refers to O’Donnell as “the American,” reminding the reader that O’Donnell is an outsider, someone who despite his appearance will always be a Westerner and not truly a part of the surroundings in which he finds himself.

El Borak and Other Desert Adventures

Robert E. Howard is famous for creating such immortal heroes as Conan the Cimmerian, Solomon Kane, and Bran Mak Morn. Less well-known but equally extraordinary are his non-fantasy adventure stories set in the Middle East and featuring such two-fisted heroes as Francis Xavier Gordon—known as “El Borak”—Kirby O’Donnell, and Steve Clarney. This trio of hard-fighting Americans, civilized men with more than a touch of the primordial in their veins, marked a new direction for Howard’s writing, and new territory for his genius to conquer.

The wily Texan El Borak, a hardened fighter who stalks the sandscapes of Afghanistan like a vengeful wolf, is rivaled among Howard’s creations only by Conan himself. In such classic tales as “The Daughter of Erlik Khan,” “Three-Bladed Doom,” and “Sons of the Hawk,” Howard proves himself once again a master of action, and with plenty of eerie atmosphere his plotting becomes tighter and twistier than ever, resulting in stories worthy of comparison to Jack London and Rudyard Kipling. Every fan of Robert E. Howard and aficionados of great adventure writing will want to own this collection of the best of Howard’s desert tales, lavishly illustrated by award-winning artists Tim Bradstreet and Jim & Ruth Keegan.

The Exotic Writings of Robert E. Howard

This is a massive hardcover facsimile volume of Howards works from Oriental Stories, Magic Carpet, Thrilling Adventures, Golden Fleece, Strange Tales, Marvel Tales, Argosy, Strange Detective Stories, Super Detective Stories, Thrilling Mystery and Spicy Adventures. Includes all interior illustrations.

This volume is printed in hardback with dust jacket, in a limited first edition with quantity of only 75 copies, each individually numbered. Cover art by Dough Klauba; Book design by Neil and Leigh Mechem; title page illustration by Neil Mechem (only on the limited edition). The reprint edition is not numbered and without the illustration.

Scanned right from the original pulp pages. No editing. No reset text.

This book is sold out and out of stock. It was published by Girasol Collectables.

Son of the White Wolf

Collects “Blood of the Gods,” “Country of the Knife” and “Son of the White Wolf,” three tales of Middle Eastern adventure featuring Francis Xavier Gordon (El Borak), published here for the first time in a book. Introduction by Fred Cook.

The Lost Valley of Iskander

Three tales of El Borak collected with illustrations by Michael William Kaluta. First out is ‘The Daughter of Erlik Khan’ which was originally published in the December 1934 issue of the pulp magazine Top-Notch. The second story presented here is ‘The Lost Valley of Iskander’, and was not published within Howard’s lifetime, the first publication was in this Collector’s Editions hardcover book. Its original title was ‘Swords of the Hills’. The last story here is ‘Hawk of the Hills’. It was originally published in the June 1935 issue of the pulp magazine Top-Notch