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To a Man Whose Name I Never Knew

To a man whose name I never knew. Published in The Junto volume 1 number 8 by Booth Mooney, November 1928.

THE JUNTO was a literary travelogue circulated from member to member on its mailing list with each member adding some content.

REH Splashes the Spicys

The car was described as dark green, with a glove compartment, rather than a door pocket. This is where he carried his gun. The ’31 Chevy was purchased second-hand after Lovecraft’s visit to New Orleans during the spring of 1932. Tyson has further provided that it was a Chevrolet Coach; a two-door.

Untitled essay (…which has characterized…)

Circa 1920-1923. Originally an untitled essay (. . . which is characterized . . .), followed by six pages of general notes on all things Celtic, tentatively titled “Notes on the Celts”; the essay was handwritten, the rest of the pages typed, all facsimile reproduction of original REH pages; was reprinted completely in THE NEW HOWARD READER; just the essay in BRAN MAK MORN.

Rattle of Bones

First published in Weird Tales, June 1929. In Germany, Kane meets a traveler named Gaston L’Armon, who seems familiar to Kane, and together they take rooms in the Cleft Skull Tavern. At this time in his career, Howard was an inexperienced professional writer. Several times when he sent his drafts story to Weird Tales, he was careful to prepare carbons.

When the first draft of Rattle of Bones was written, Howard decided that it needed another ending. The draft consisted of seven pages of which he rewrote the last two and changed the ending. This was what he sent to Weird Tales and what was published. The REH Foundation printed the first version of the 1928 story in their very first issue of ‘The Robert E. Howard Foundation Newsletter’ in the spring of 2007.

In his own image

“In His Own Image” by Robert E. Howard is a vivid 2200-word narrative that explores the diverse and often harsh societal landscape of New Orleans through the eyes of the author. Written during Howard’s visit to the city in the early 20th century, the essay captures the essence of its people and the complexities of urban life.

Golnor the Ape

Golnor the Ape. Unfinished. Listed as “Golnar” in the Last Celt. Appeared as “Golnor” in Crypt of Cthulhu and The New Howard Reader.

“Golden Hope” Christmas

“‘Golden Hope’ Christmas,” a story written by Robert E. Howard during his time at Brownwood High School, was published in the December 22, 1922 issue of The Tattler, the school’s student newspaper.

A Gent from Bear Creek (short story)

“A Gent from Bear Creek” is the title of both an original short story, as well as a novel created by combining several previous short stories with some new material; the previously published short stories were altered a little to create chapters with a continuous storyline, and new material was added as additional chapters.

This short story was altered slightly to become Chapter 5 of the novel, A Gent From Bear Creek.

Dear Mrs. Shane

“Dear Mrs. Shane” is an unfinished story fragment by Robert E. Howard. The typescript was first introduced to the public in the Robert E. Howard Newsletter, Volume 7, Number 2. The narrative unfolds as a letter from an unnamed woman to Mrs. Shane, wherein she recounts her personal experiences and emotional turmoil following her marriage to a wealthy young man from a rural background.

The Celtica notes of Robert E. Howard

This originally was the untitled essay “. . . which is characterized . . .”, followed by six pages of general notes on all things Celtic, tentatively titled “Notes on the Celts”; the essay was handwritten, the rest of the pages typed, all facsimile reproduction of original REH pages; was reprinted completely in THE NEW HOWARD READER; just the essay in BRAN MAK MORN.