Search Results for: The Frost-Giant

The Frost-Giant’s Daughter

Originally written by REH as a Conan story “The Frost-Giant’s Daughter”(REH1). The story was not accepted, so REH rewrote it with a different hero (Amra), and changed the title to “The Frost King’s Daughter” (REH2).

When published by The Fantasy Fan, they changed the title to “Gods of the North”. L. Sprague de Camp found the original manuscript, but extensively rewrote it, and called it “The Frost Giant’s Daughter” (REH/LSDC).

Gods of the North

Gods of the North. Originally written by REH as a Conan story “The Frost-Giant’s Daughter” (REH1). The story was not accepted, so REH rewrote it with a different hero (Amra), and changed the title to “The Frost King’s Daughter” (REH2). When published by THE FANTASY FAN, they changed the title to GODS OF THE NORTH.

The Frost King’s Daughter

Originally written by REH as a Conan story “The Frost-Giant’s Daughter” (REH1). The story was not accepted, so REH rewrote it with a different hero (Amra), and changed the title to “The Frost King’s Daughter” (REH2). When published by THE FANTASY FAN, they changed the title to “Gods of the North.”

The Frost Giant’s Daughter

Originally written by REH as a Conan story “The Frost-Giant’s Daughter” (REH1).  The story was not accepted, so REH rewrote it with a different hero (Amra), and changed the title to “The Frost King’s Daughter” (REH2).

When published by The Fantasy Fan, they changed the title to “Gods of the North”. L. Sprague de Camp found the original manuscript, but extensively rewrote it, and called it “The Frost Giant’s Daughter” (REH/LSDC).

The Vale of Lost Women

THE VALE OF LOST WOMEN is a fantasy short story by Howard and one of his original short stories about Conan the Cimmerian. It was not published during his lifetime. The Magazine of Horror first published the story in its Spring, 1967 issue.

The Phoenix on the Sword

“The Phoenix on the Sword” is one of the original short stories about Conan the Cimmerian was written by Howard and first published in Weird Tales magazine in December 1932. The tale, in which Howard created the character of Conan, was a rewrite of the unpublished Kull story “By This Axe I Rule!”, with long passages being identical.

The Hyborian Age

“The Hyborian Age” is an essay by Robert E. Howard pertaining to the Hyborian Age, the fictional setting of his stories about Conan the Cimmerian. It was written in the 1930s but only partly published during Howard’s lifetime. Its purpose was to maintain consistency within his fictional setting.

The essay sets out in detail the major events of Howard’s pseudohistorical prehistory, both period before and after the time of the Conan stories. In describing the cataclysmic end of the Thurian Age, the period described in his Kull stories, Howard links both sequences of stories into one shared universe. The names he gives his various nations and peoples of the age borrow liberally from actual history and myth. The essay also sets out the racial and geographical heritage of these fictional entities, making them progenitors of modern nations. For example, Howard makes the Gaels descendants of his own Cimmerians.

The God in the Bowl

“The God in the Bowl” is one of the original short stories featuring the sword and sorcery hero Conan the Cimmerian, written by American author Robert E. Howard but not published during his lifetime. Set during the fictional Hyborian Age, the plot sees Conan robbing a temple museum only to become the prime suspect in a murder mystery. The story first saw publication in September 1952 in Space Science Fiction and has been reprinted many times since.

In the Nemedian municipality of Numalia, the second largest city of Nemedia, Conan enters a museum and antique house called the Temple of Kallian Publico.

While robbing the museum, Conan becomes embroiled in a murder investigation. The strangled corpse of the temple’s owner and curator, Kallian Publico, is found by a night watchman. Though the Cimmerian is the prime suspect, the investigating magistrate, Demetrio, and the prefect of police, Dionus, show forbearance. The two allow Conan to remain free and keep his unsheathed sword while their men search the premises. A combination of Conan’s physique, his glare, and his insistence that he’ll disembowel the first person who tried to apprehend him keeps the guards at bay.

Conan

Conan simply grew up in my mind a few years ago when I was stopping in a little border town on the lower Rio Grande. I did not create him by any conscious process. He simply stalked full grown out of oblivion and set me at work recording the saga of his adventures.